New Survey Results on AD/HD Suggest That Later-Life Diagnosis Leads to Lifetime of Challenges

The results from an informal survey on AD/HD released today reinforce existing scientific research that the disorder does not affect children alone, and when left undiagnosed until adulthood, can create much larger relationship challenges for those with the disorder.

The survey, released by Children and Adults with Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (CHADD) -- the nation's largest family organization serving children and adults with AD/HD -- was informal and unscientific, but the results nonetheless provide a window into the lives of more than 3,800 individuals in the United States who either self-identified as having AD/HD or have a family member with the disorder. Results have been released in conjunction with National AD/HD Awareness Week (September 14-20, 2009).

Of the 3,821 people who completed the survey -- all either CHADD members, former members, or people who are listed in the organization's database -- 40 percent (1,710) indicated that they have AD/HD. Three-quarters of those with AD/HD noted receiving a diagnosis after the age of 30.

New Survey Results on AD/HD Suggest That Later-Life Diagnosis Leads to Lifetime of Challenges